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PowerPoint Power Tips (hint – stop doing what you always do!)

PowerPoint Power Tips (hint – stop doing what you always do!)

Audiences rebel against PowerPoint

Have you ever gone to sleep at night saying to yourself, “Darn! I wish I had seen one more PowerPoint deck today.” ?

Have you ever gone to sleep saying to yourself, “Darn! I wish I had been more inspired today.”* ?

You, all of you, from CEO to Sales to Personnel to Purchasing, you are killing us with your PowerPoint.

That’s because bullets kill.

Five Main PowerPoint Offenders

  • Too many graphics on one slide.
  • Too many topics.
  • Too many bullets & too many sentences (which are worse than bullets).
  • Too many details.
  • Too many dissolves, spins or other cheesy transitions.

Every Main Offender on this list starts with “too many” because you are over-stuffing each slide. We do not know where to look first. In the midst of our confusion, we stop listening to you in hopes of being entertained by something on your slide.

Boredom + lethargy sets in and we shift over to what we really want to do – a sneaky wild round of Candy Crush Saga.

So, what’s a great slide look like?

It’s VISUAL.

Effective slides incorporate these three commandments

  1. Thou Must use good, clear (not copyrighted by someone else) pictures that support your message.
  2. Thou Must think ‘Less is More’ when putting your slides together. At the very least, can you please take one busy slide with many points and divide it into several slides so that each one has only one point/slide?
  3. Thou Must remember YOU are the presenter, NOT your slide deck. Don’t hide behind your PowerPoint deck – literally (you’re standing in the dark or hidden by your computer) and figuratively (you’re reading your slides and adding nothing else).

On the other hand, keep doing what you always do and Speak For Yourself® & Associates will remain busy cleaning it up for you!

*FYI, inspiration comes from stories that reinforce your message that can be supported by great visuals.

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Photo ©:  123RF Stock Photo

 

Surprising Adds that Could Make You a Super Communicator

Surprising Adds that Could Make You a Super Communicator

Ever been to a business event, power breakfast or strategy session dominated by one person? How about a dinner party or book club? You know the one!

The best communicators aren’t always the ones who talk the most in these various settings.

Charles Duhigg, Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative journalist, shares three ways we can be “super communicators” and really connect with almost everyone.

How to be a super communicator on a consistent basis

Ask questions

  • Super communicators ask a lot more questions. In fact, 10 to 20 times more questions.
  • Some questions invite you in. “Tell me more about your xxx.”
  • Some are deep questions – getting others to talk about beliefs, experiences. “How do you feel about being on the board of xxx?” Or, “Can you tell me a memory that is really important to you?”
  • Super communicators ask not just about facts but how you feel about what you are doing – all in hopes of creating reciprocal authenticity.

Be a humble conversationalist

Most super communicators were once crummy communicators. Duhigg’s research points out that these struggling communicators had to become keenly aware of having to listen intently to understand what the other person was saying. This heightened awareness propelled them to become super communicators with these attributes:  being honest, authentic,  vulnerable and nonjudgmental.

Looping for Understanding (great for conflict management):

  1. Ask a question … a deeper one. (see my first point above)
  2. Repeat back what they said.
  3. Ask if you got it right.

You don’t have to agree or disagree. “I understand where you are coming from. I think I’ve heard what you are trying to say. I have a different point of view…”

7 Super Communicator Goals

  • To listen for understanding.
  • To lower the burden of the conversation. You are not trying to get them to agree with you.
  • To find a connection.
  • To get others in the group to speak.
  • To be generally interested in what others are thinking.
  • To give credit to others when context permits.
  • To better navigate tough conversations.

Don’t dominate a conversation. Be the super communicator that makes the conversation of interest to all.

Thank you to Judy Dedmon Coyle for sharing this podcast with me.

Source: Krys Boyd’s NPR “Think” Podcast with Charles Duhigg, author of “Supercommunicators: How to Unlock the Secret Language of Connection

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Nothing Eclipses Your Executive Presence

Nothing Eclipses Your Executive Presence

Well, maybe on April 8, 2024. 😎

That’s the date of the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse that will darken our skies, especially in my hometown, Dallas, Texas  … we are right in the middle of the path.

But, on every other day ➜

Show your executive presence by using the 7 C’s

Jun Medalla, writing for Business Insider, outlines these seven core tenets of executive presence:

☀️ Composure – Have grace under pressure. Stay calm.

☀️ Connection – Don’t hog the stage. Show others you’re engaged by asking for feedback and having good eye contact to all in the room and leaning towards those that speak.

☀️ Charisma – Share your positive energy by shining the spotlight on others. Listen, ask questions, have good eye contact and an open facial expression (aka smile). Make others feel understood.

☀️ Confidence – My mother-in-law, a professional portrait photographer always said, “Sit dynamically forward!”. Use body language to take control of the room. Sit tall. Stand tall.

☀️ Credibility – Demonstrate integrity, show expertise and good judgment, and be accountable, responsible and dependable.

☀️ Clarity – Prepare for meetings to avoid uncertainty. Use our Speak For Yourself® Blueprint presentation outline to strategize your 2 to 5 main points.

☀️ Conciseness – Less is more. Embrace your inner editor by asking yourself these 3 questions before you speak: “So what?” and  “Who cares?”  and  “Is anyone interested in this besides me?”.

Don’t get eclipsed by poor executive presence. You do not want to be kept in the dark, except from 1:40 to 1:44 CST, in Dallas on 4.8.24.  ☀️⚫️☀️

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

The Best Speech That Broke All The Rules & how this relates to you

The Best Speech That Broke All The Rules & how this relates to you

Jason Kelce seated at Eagles News Conference reading his retirement speech

Jason Kelce’s retirement speech

Longtime Eagles center Jason Kelce announced his retirement with a nearly 45-minute speech filled with tears, memories and thank yous.

The Philadelphia Inquirer writes, “After 13 seasons with the Birds, there was a lot to say — and Kelce made sure he didn’t miss a thing, starting with his first day in pads before moving through high school, college, and the NFL. The 36-year-old future Hall of Famer also made sure to shout out his family, his fans, and the entire city of Philadelphia…”.

I’m not a Philadelphia Eagles’ fan. I’m not an avid sports follower. I am mesmerized.

Speech rules Jason Kelce broke

🎤 Rule: There’s an old and reasoned adage – “Be brief. Be gay. Be gone.”    ✅ Jason’s take: Talk for over 40 minutes and show emotion. He cares which makes us care.

🎤 Rule: Don’t cry.    ✅ Jason’s take: He cried, a lot. USA Today writes, “Even people who aren’t sports fans tuned into the press conference and cried with the Kelce family. It got many people thinking: It’s refreshing to see men cry.”

🎤 Rule: Don’t read verbatim from your notes.   ✅ Jason’s take: He looked down most of the time reading from his mobile.

🎤 Rule: Have good eye contact with your audience.   ✅ Jason’s take: See above! He’s staring at his phone.

🎤 Rule: Conclude with a compelling ending.   ✅ Jason’s take: End by saying, “That’s all I got.”

How rules and breaking rules applies to your presentations

Speech rules are a starting point. Our Speak For Yourself® Blueprint 8-step presentation organization tool works. You’ll be able to plan and execute speeches without going nuts.

Jason shows that you can pivot. And, like Jason, here are the times when you can break the good ‘ole rules:

  • You know your audience and you know they’ll understand your MO.
  • You know your topic, inside and out.
  • You have a high presentation skills’ comfort zone.

Quoting Jason Kelce, “That’s all I got.”

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Acceptance Speeches – do’s and don’ts

Acceptance Speeches – do’s and don’ts

Congrats to all of you who get recognized by your peers.

Last night my cousin Neal received just such an award from the Northern TX PGA of America. My husband, Jim, and I proudly attend the President’s Dinner at a beautiful golf country club (of course!) and I have the chance to observe 16 award presentations.

Yep – 16 acceptance speeches, each being around 4-5 minutes! You do the math.

Don’t think “How boring can you get”! These guys do a great job and I stayed engaged even though I know nothing about them or their accolades.

What makes Acceptance Speeches work

My cousin Neal receiving the Byron Nelson Award

🎤  Brevity.  My cousin Neal begins his acceptance speech saying, “I didn’t have my glasses on when I read the instructions … I think the PGA wants me to speak for 4 to 5 minutes or 45 minutes!” He laughs. We laugh. And thankfully Neal sticks to the guidelines. Remember this adage, “Be brief, be gay, be gone.”

🎤  Authenticity – being true to your own personality, values, and spirit.  I stay engaged for the entire evening because each awardee speaks from his truths. The superintendent award winner is overwhelmed as he shares with joy and honesty, “Thank you so much for including us in your award banquet. We aren’t the golfers, we keep the grounds, grass and fairways ready so you can golf. I love ‘my’ golf country club. We have trouble sometimes with the creek that runs through it, but that’s not our fault!”

🎤  Inclusivity. What to include … you ask? First: Context about the award itself and the group that bestows the award on you. Second: People you wish to thank. Write every name down. Yes, even your partner’s name! One guy almost forgot to thank his wife!

What to avoid when receiving an award

❌  Winging it – No notes! No prep! No good!  You’ll go long on tangents and short on what you really want to convey.

❌  Digitizing it – reading your speech from your iPad or phone.  OK – You’re going to push back on this. Many of you rely on your digital notes, and when it works you’re golden. But you’ve also encountered times when your battery dies, the brightness of the screen fades, or the scrolling causes you to lose your place. Please bring your notes, on paper, in a font size you can see. (Better to be old-fashioned then lose your train of thought which did happen to one of the PGA awardees.)

🎤  If you don’t want to accept an award because you hate the thought of giving one of these speeches, call us! Happy to help you become comfortable receiving recognition you deserve.

 

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved

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