Why Speaking Anxiety Can Be a Good Thing

Why Speaking Anxiety Can Be a Good Thing

Fear of public speaking is a common form of anxiety. Everyone gets nervous before giving a speech. Full disclosure – I get nervous too. In fact I rarely eat much before a presentation. (About 15 minutes into my speech or workshop I’m starving!)

How can anxiety be useful in public speaking?

Public speaking creates an increase in adrenaline. What you do with this extra jolt separates those that become miserable at the lectern vs those that become more energized.

How can you capitalize on this extra jolt of energy?

  • Accept the obvious. Do NOT wish this anxiety to go away. That takes you down a slippery negative slope. You can’t undo these nerves and then you feel even more anxiety when the nervousness persists!
  • Do the reverse. Say to yourself, “Great – I’ve got this extra energy. All good.”
  • Don’t say, “I’m nervous”. Say, “I’m excited”. It makes a difference.
  • Think of this boost of adrenaline as a shot of caffeine.
  • Do all of the steps we’ve blogged about to ensure your success, like being prepared, knowing your audience, getting to the venue early, drinking room temp water, practicing out loud and doing some pre vocal warmups.

What happens if you are NOT nervous/excited?

What if your upcoming speech is the 29th time you’re giving the exact same message? You’re almost lethargic. Not good!

Find ways to add some nervousness/energy … as counter-intuitive as this sounds.

  • Shake it up – rework your topic.
  • Create new visuals.
  • Try new material.

The paradox of the fear of public speaking

You need the extra adrenaline. Use it to add more energy to your delivery. It’s a good thing.

Author: Karen Cortell Reisman is Founder of Speak For Yourself®, a communication consulting firm, and the author of 2 books on how to communicate. She lives in Dallas, Texas and she always has nuts or a protein bar with her at a speaking gig to snack on once her appetite kicks in.

© 2022 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved

Communicate Well: Your Secret Weapon

Communicate Well: Your Secret Weapon

Our attention spans rival those of a mosquito.

21 ways to enhance your audience’s retention

Last week’s blog explains the surprising truth about being memorable. First – your listeners comprehend what you’re showing (visual mode), second – by what you’re saying (auditory mode) and … third – by what you’re doing (kinesthetic mode).

While your spatial movement comes in last place in this triad, it’s got the power to cement what you’re showing and saying in the brain cells of your audience.

Your movement do’s

  • Walk on & pause before talking & establish eye contact with your group.
  • Face the audience.
  • Stand with arms resting at your sides, when not gesturing.
  • Stand with weight evenly distributed on both feet.
  • Be natural. Use your hands & arms.
  • Sit with good posture, if seated. (And don’t rock in your chair!)
  • Move around with purpose.
    • Speak on Point #1, then move.
    • Speak on Point #2, then move.
    • When you move quickly, you stir the audience. When you move slowly you keep them entranced.
  • Stand CENTER STAGE for your most important comments.
  • Post speech: pause w eye contact before leaving stage.

Your movement don’ts

  • Box Trot: Moving around in an imaginary square.
  • Cha-Cha-Cha: Taking one step forward and one step back repetitively.
  • Tennis Game: Pacing back and forth. Is your audience watching a tennis match?
  • Cruise Ship: Swaying … shifting your weight from leg to leg.
  • Fiddling Fingers: Picking at your cuticles.
  • Fig Leaf: Hands clasped below your waist.
  • Parade Rest: Hands clasped behind your back.
  • Stern Father: Arms crossed just below your chest.
  • Thigh Intrigue: Hands in your pockets.
  • Pen/Paper Massage: Playing with laser pointer, pen, and/or paper.
  • Arthritic Arm: One hand holding the opposite arm.
  • Itchy Face & Scalp Disease: Hands on your face or in your hair.

Your secret communication weapon

Move with purpose. Don’t detract from your message by being unaware of your stance, posture and gestures.

It’s not about speaking… it’s about getting heard!

Author: Karen Cortell Reisman is Founder of Speak For Yourself®, a communication consulting firm, and the author of 2 books on how to communicate. She lives in Dallas, Texas and admires the tenacity of mosquitos even with their limited attention spans.

Did you know we offer a free 20-minute communication consultation?

© photo: 123RF

© 2022 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved

3 Excellent APPs for Public Speakers

What to learn how to cook filet mignon? There’s an app for that. Looking for good places to go mountain biking? Yep. There’s an app for that, too. There are apps for every iphone/ipad user.  Here are 3 excellent iphone and ipad apps for public speakers:

Speaker APP 1 – mPrompt: mPrompt is a “teleprompter” app that allows you to use your iphone (or ipad) screen as a teleprompter. You can download and edit the speeches directly to the app and change fonts and colors of words to remind you to emphasize certain points. The speed of text flow is also customizable. It can be used with an LCD projector or on its own! At a low price of just $1.99, this app is perfect for those who want to regulate speech flow and speed.

Speaker APP 2 – Infonet Presenter: Infonet presenter is an all in one presentation displayer that can download many types of files. It is perfect for organizing a presentation, copy and pasting photos and videos, and the slides can be used as a whiteboard. This app is perfect for teachers and presenters trying to educate through this medium (appadvice.com)

Speaker APP 3 – KeyNote: Every Keynote speaker should own this app! It is the single most comprehensive and elegant slide presentation creator in the App store. The app comes with built in start-up slides for slide that feature clear, crisp designs. This app makes flawless charts and is compatible with other similar apps. The sophisticated design and animated transitions will have your audiences enthralled.

Karen Speaks to Dental Audience in Albuquerque on: Did You Hear What I Didn’t Say? How to Speak for Yourself!

Thank you to Drs. Kevin Harrison and Dianna Montoya for inviting me to speak; and for putting together a great group of dental offices. We had a really fun morning learning about how to communicate trust and grow your dental practices.

Dr. Kevin Harrison and Dr. Dianna Montoya with Karen

Dr. Frank Montoya and Dr. Dianna Montoya with Karen

Dr. Kevin Harrison and Karen Cortell Reisman

The Rules Have Changed

 

Karen with Randy Gage

At least that’s what Randy Gage says. In his new book, Risky is the New Safe, Gage outlines a strong theory that there has never been a better time to be alive. And that’s because there will be more cataclysmic change in the next 15 years than in the past 1000.

We can take advantage of this shift and make millions; or lose millions. It all depends on the questions we ask – given today’s realities.

Here are snippets from his conversation this morning with the National Speakers Association – North Texas Chapter:

• 5 million people have a smart phone today. In the future our smart phone screen will follow us everywhere – from our cars to our homes to our offices. It’s electronic tethering.

• The Euro will collapse within 3 years.

• The only free cheese is in the mousetrap.

• Be a critical thinker. Question authority. Titles/Degrees mean zip.

• We process more info in one day than our grandparents did in 5 years.

• By no later than 2022 Artificial Intelligence will exceed human intelligence.

• Mobile Apps change everything.

• WW III in the business world – the battle to control streaming video.

• Look at successful systems and ask what can I learn from Cirque de Soleil? What can I learn from Jimmy Buffet? What can I learn from the Eagles? All three have shifted modalities to be on top of this new market.

What are the critical questions to ask not only to stay in business but also to soar?

 

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