(972) 490.8676
PowerPoint Power Tips (hint – stop doing what you always do!)

PowerPoint Power Tips (hint – stop doing what you always do!)

Audiences rebel against PowerPoint

Have you ever gone to sleep at night saying to yourself, “Darn! I wish I had seen one more PowerPoint deck today.” ?

Have you ever gone to sleep saying to yourself, “Darn! I wish I had been more inspired today.”* ?

You, all of you, from CEO to Sales to Personnel to Purchasing, you are killing us with your PowerPoint.

That’s because bullets kill.

Five Main PowerPoint Offenders

  • Too many graphics on one slide.
  • Too many topics.
  • Too many bullets & too many sentences (which are worse than bullets).
  • Too many details.
  • Too many dissolves, spins or other cheesy transitions.

Every Main Offender on this list starts with “too many” because you are over-stuffing each slide. We do not know where to look first. In the midst of our confusion, we stop listening to you in hopes of being entertained by something on your slide.

Boredom + lethargy sets in and we shift over to what we really want to do – a sneaky wild round of Candy Crush Saga.

So, what’s a great slide look like?

It’s VISUAL.

Effective slides incorporate these three commandments

  1. Thou Must use good, clear (not copyrighted by someone else) pictures that support your message.
  2. Thou Must think ‘Less is More’ when putting your slides together. At the very least, can you please take one busy slide with many points and divide it into several slides so that each one has only one point/slide?
  3. Thou Must remember YOU are the presenter, NOT your slide deck. Don’t hide behind your PowerPoint deck – literally (you’re standing in the dark or hidden by your computer) and figuratively (you’re reading your slides and adding nothing else).

On the other hand, keep doing what you always do and Speak For Yourself® & Associates will remain busy cleaning it up for you!

*FYI, inspiration comes from stories that reinforce your message that can be supported by great visuals.

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Photo ©:  123RF Stock Photo

 

Silencing The Noise – how to communicate in a crisis

Silencing The Noise – how to communicate in a crisis

You now know that Catherine, Princess of Wales, has been diagnosed with cancer and she’s in the early stages of chemotherapy treatment.

The British Royal Family, according to the NYT, “focused so much on privacy they created the information vacuum that resulted in all this white noise and nonsense.”

Catherine silenced the noise.

Communication vacuums

A communication vacuum happens when a gap is allowed between what a person thinks others know and what they actually know.

Ed Pike writes in Leadership Wizdom, “Leaving a vacuum in communication invites your team to fill it with their worst possible nightmares or scenarios. Every nuance that you did not realize that you had made can be converted into a skyscraper sized monster.”

How to handle business communication vacuums

1️⃣  Be aware ➜  As leaders you must be proactive about how you communicate information. Are you leaving gaps?

2️⃣  Be timely ➜  Consider if you can pre-empt and get ahead of the storm. Tell what you know, and what you DON’T know – along with when you hope to share more info.

3️⃣  Be transparent ➜ Why? Uncertainty paralyzes your team and their performance. Fill the vacuum with as much info as you can to give your team predictability and a feeling of control.

With eloquence and gravitas Catherine, Princess of Wales, cleaned up the “dirt” in this vacuum frenzy.

How to Really Know a Person – Part 2

How to Really Know a Person – Part 2

Last week’s blog shared three ways we sabotage personal and professional relationships by being Diminishers, according to David Brooks, the author of How To Know a Person – The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen.

Today I’ll share some constructive steps that make it easier to see other people in all their fullness. Brooks call this an Illuminator’s outlook.

Illuminators: How to really see another person

➜ Receptivity – overcoming insecurities and self-preoccupation & opening yourself up to the experience of another.

Brooks says, “It means you resist the urge to project your own viewpoint; you do not ask, ‘How would I feel if I were in your shoes?’ Instead, you are patiently ready for what the other person is offering.” This art of patience and empathy is a practice to strive for.

➜ Active curiosity – having an explorer’s heart.

Keep asking questions with a genuine interest of wanting to know more about others. Studies show that life is better when you’re curious.

➜ Tenderness – deep emotional concern about another being.

Think Mister Rogers as he interacted with children. Think Ted Lasso as he relates to his players. Believe!

➜ A holistic attitude – trying to see the “all” of a person.

How often do we mis-see people by seeing only a piece of them? Brooks comments, “Some doctors mis-see their patients when they see only their bodies. Some employees mis-see workers when they see only their productivity.” Our goal is to resist every urge to simplify in this way of perceiving others.

Being an Illuminator is an ideal. We can all try our best to illuminate others without imposing cliché character types. Think about how this outlook can elevate your work and personal relationships.

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

How to Really Know a Person

How to Really Know a Person

David Brooks talks to me while I’m doing my gym workout.

David, a bestselling author, reads his latest book, How To Know a Person – The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen, into my ear buds while I’m lifting weights.

He’s making lots of sense on how to best navigate through our personal and professional pursuits.

In this short blog series I’ll share some of Brooks’ findings on qualities that make it hard to see others; and qualities that make it easy to see other people in all their fullness.

Today I’ll focus on the former – what Brooks defines as Diminishers.

Diminishers: How not to see a person

➜  Egotism – Being self-centered.

A Diminisher is all about, “Let me tell you my opinion.” Brooks comments that many people are unable to step outside of their own points of view which shows up as a lack of curiosity about other people.

➜  The Lesser-Minds Problem – Perceiving that you are more complicated, subtle and high-minded than others.

You have access to all of your thoughts/motivations and just a tiny access to other people’s minds shared by what they say out loud.

For example, Brooks writes, when business school students answered why they were going into business the common response was, “I care about doing something worthwhile.” When asked why others were going into business, they replied, “For the money.” Lesser motivations, lesser minds!

➜  Instant Size-up – Making generalizations about groups and cultural trends.  

“The size-up is what you do when you first meet someone: You check out their look, and you immediately start making judgments about them…. Most of us have inborn proclivities that prevent us from perceiving others accurately.”

All in all, Diminishers make it hard to really see others. Next week I’ll share some of Brooks’ set of skills for being an Illuminator, the ability to see others in their fullness. It does not just happen.

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Super Bowl LVIII Best Commercial & what this ad models about super communication

Super Bowl LVIII Best Commercial & what this ad models about super communication

We are back with our annual selection of the best Super Bowl Commercial.

Speak For Yourself® picks our favorite commercial each year. Why? To learn best ways to get YOUR message across without paying over $LVIII,000,000. (the 30-second spot + talent + production).

Drum Roll….

This year Dunkin Donuts’ ‘The DunKings’ commercial wins.

Use this list of DunKing strategies for your next board presentation, zoom meeting or project review all modeled in this commercial.

1️⃣  Clarity. Many of the ads tried too hard and became disjointed. You could not figure out what they were selling till the last second. Our DunKing ad reveals the product up front. From the first to the last expensive nano-second you see the Dunkin’ logo and/or the company brand colors.

🏈 Note to you: Are you using your logo and brand colors everywhere, from your digital presence to your merchandise?

2️⃣  Self-deprecating humor. Our well-known cast, Ben Affleck, Matt Damon, Tom Brady, Jack Harlow, Jennifer Lopez, & Fat Joe make fun of themselves throughout this ad. Look at their outfits!

🏈 Note to you: Laugh at yourself – it makes you more approachable. We will then want to listen to you.

3️⃣  Call to Action.  Affleck tells Damon as they walk away, “Chill. They’re naming a new drink after us”. A new product is born at Dunkin’ Donuts! In other commercials you had to really search for the product and its relevance.

🏈 Note to you: End your emails, presentations and meetings asking for what you want. Include “next steps.” Move the conversation forward.

4️⃣  BONUS TIdbitAccording to CNN, “Part of the deal to get Affleck on board was Dunkin’ making a sizable donation to his nonprofit.”

🏈 Note to you: Have integrity. It will show up even if you don’t advertise it.

Your LVIII-million dollar communication takeaways ➜

Be clear about who you are, what you want, and what you are pitching. Be consistent with your branding. And find the humor.

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Pin It on Pinterest