When Nintendo launched the Wii, people were shocked at the gaming system’s ability to wirelessly sense the controller. It seemed as though Nintendo had sealed its fate as the “Apple” of video games. They were the first to come out with such revolutionary technology, and based on the dominant market share that the iPhone has, it only made sense to believe that Wii would take over the same way. However, Nintendo lacked the user-friendly aspect that Apple has, and they underestimated how far technology could really go.

Recently, X-BOX released Kinect, a gaming system where your body is the controller. X-BOX fans, largely teenagers and young 20-somethings, were not inclined to switch to a Wii and lose their access to games like Call of Duty, so many of these gamers were excited about this system as an addition to their X-BOX instead of as a replacement.

This technological accomplishment, while amazing, takes me back to a concern that I’ve discussed before. What motivation is left for anyone to leave the house to exercise or interact with others beyond using a headset if all of our communication can occur from the comfort of our couch?

The last twenty years have seen an exponential increase in technology, which is certainly admirable and inspiring. However, where does it end? Computer chips in our brains don’t sound as crazy as they used to. Three-dimensional televisions are currently available to the general public. Televisions, phones, and computers have been joined together in ways that were previously unimaginable. I can understand that technology advancing this quickly is something that I should be embraced and appreciated, but I am concerned about where it ends. Let’s not lose ourselves at the expense of feeling “Kinect-ed”.

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