How to Think On Your Feet Tip #4

State your answers chronologically. This method works well for illustrations, instructional material, or any situation involving a timeline. Provide your info using a linear format. Then give a summary sentence.

Example: “Sam, tell the Board about Invexa.”

“Alex – let me give you the three highlights since we merged ten years ago. In 2008 we made a capital investment in plastics. In 2013 our goal of rolling out the tech sector was met. And last year, 2015, we introduced the food component after finishing all of the focus group studies. We are meeting our benchmark metrics at Invexa.”

In our example Sam gives a brief synopsis that everyone can follow.

Your Speak For Yourself® Challenge: Use this “time” strategy over the next couple of days. It’s a great impromptu speech tool. You can even use this technique when explaining a recipe. Just ask me about my made-from-scratch pesto.

Stay tuned for more specific tips on how to sound organized when you’re thinking on your feet.

© 123RF Stock Photo

© Karen Cortell Reisman, M.S., author of 3 books and President of Speak For Yourself®, works with decision makers on how to speak with gravitas. It’s all in how you speak for yourself. Karen also speaks about her cousin, Albert Einstein, in a message about hope, resilience and brassieres.

Read more at www.SpeakForYourself.com/blog.

Did you know that we also do customized workshops on how to think on your feet? Click here: https://www.karencortellreisman.com/seminar-what-i-didnt-say.html

 

Pin It on Pinterest