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One Trick for Texting that Guarantees More Productivity

One Trick for Texting that Guarantees More Productivity

Text messaging (92%) is second only to phone calls at 95% as the most widely used form of communication.

Texting is integral to the way you now communicate due to its speed, convenience and ability to create a permanent record.

So, how can you get more efficient with texting?

The other day I texted a fellow boutique business owner. She’s busy. I’m busy. I had three different time-sensitive questions to ask. I numbered the questions… #1, #2 and #3.

Because she’s smart, she answered each question using the same numbering and same order.

I responded … and you know how … same numbering system.

Done! Questions answered! In less than 10 minutes.

Your Texting Trick for more productivity

Organize your texts by numbering your questions, or answers, or observations.

Heed this one tip because an organized  text can save you time and money.

Number away.

PS: What other time-saving texting tips do you use?

➜ Thank you to @AnnZimmermanGallant for being this blog’s muse. You also do great texts! 😎

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Your #1 Clue to Great Email Openers

Your #1 Clue to Great Email Openers

You’re wasting crucial digital real estate with weak email openers.

Don’t state the obvious. Especially in your first sentence.

You’re thinking, “That IS obvious. Why would I start an email with info my audience already knows? I don’t do this.”

But, you do.

Whether you’re a Fortune 500 company, the president of a small business, or writing your annual holiday letter to friends/family/clients … you’re starting your emails with this: “As the year draws to a close, we reflect on the challenges…”

Can’t argue with that sentiment, but is this Non-Newsflash the way you want to gain your audiences’ attention? Hint: you’re NOT!

Our finger is itching to smash the Delete Key before we even read your second non-helpful line, “To be honest, this hasn’t been the year we had planned.”*

Your #1 clue:

Lead with your need.

❌ Do NOT state the obvious. (And please stop saying “to be honest”! Is everything else you write/say dishonest?!)

Your BONUS CLUE:

✅ Start your emails with the word “You” or “Your” and make your info about your reader. Ex: read the first line of this blog!

❌ “I wanted to follow up with you about…” 😬😬😬

You can do better!

*Source: we won’t reveal it! This sentence is verbatim from a city-wide newsletter we received.

Attention Crisis – Best communication antidotes to get heard above the noise

Attention Crisis – Best communication antidotes to get heard above the noise

I planned to write this blog an hour ago. But Cyber Monday got in the way. I’m distracted by a great deal!

Welcome to your world.

Did you know that your attention span now trades on the open market?

Graham Burnett, Alyssa Loh and Peter Schmidt write in the New York Times,

“Increasingly powerful systems seek to ensure that our attention is never truly ours… We are witnessing the dark side of our new technological lives … Vast quantities of high-pressure media content are pumped into our faces.”

You know this because you too are distracted by emails, breaking news and discounts.

This guest opinion NYT essay goes on to share, “You are lucky these days to get 47 seconds of focused attention on a discrete task.”

How do you get heard above the noise when you only have 47 seconds?

  • Be unique from the get go. Do not begin a meeting, presentation or even a Linked In post with generic pleasantries. Start with a startling statement, a story, a quote, or a solution to a problem targeted to your listeners.
  • Tell good stories – in a speech, at your holiday party table, or in the hallways at your next conference.
  • Schedule carefully. Place your presentation mid-morning if possible. Caffeine has been injected and your digital life is under control.
  • Insert breaks – if you’re talking for more than 90 minutes.
  • Mix it up. If you’re giving a presentation of any length keep your content moving and include your audience in nonthreatening ways.
  • Be organized. Tangents will kill you.
  • Use humor. Carefully. I’m not a fan of jokes because you might alienate others. Use self-deprecating humor. One time my computer blew up. Another time someone stole it. Painful then, funny now … and lessons abound. (Always bring a backup and put your info/ppt in the cloud.)
  • Bribe often! I always throw snickers into the group to bring home the point that we need to snicker/chuckle more. Take your work seriously, take yourself a little less seriously.

Catching a small piece of chocolate – perfect attention crisis antidote!

Your Owner’s Guide to giving a prepared or impromptu speech

Your Owner’s Guide to giving a prepared or impromptu speech

Think of a 500-piece puzzle. Heck, think of a 50-piece puzzle. Either way you begin by dumping out all of those pieces on a table and finding the four corners. You build from there.

Same principle applies to the way you communicate. Whether you are delivering a company business update, or you’re on a panel about how Wall Street evaluates your organization, or you’re writing an email – you begin by developing your “four corners”.

You need to construct these four “corners” to get heard above the noise ➜

🎤 CORNER #1 — Your Audience: Who are you talking to and what do they need/want to know? How can you meet and exceed their expectations?

🎤 CORNER #2 — Your Statement of Purpose: What’s your overarching theme? If this is a book, what’s the title? If this is an email, what’s your concise subject header?

🎤 CORNER #3 — Your Return on Investment: What’s the ROI for your listeners … at your quarterly town hall, in a zoom meeting, on the golf course, or by email? Will you save them time or money? Will you increase their competitive advantage? Will you make them happier or stop their headaches? Sharing your ROI creates buy in.

🎤 CORNER #4 — Your Call To Action: After listening to you or reading your digital info what do you want them to do, think or feel? What are your “next steps”? Without a “call to action” you have wasted everyone’s time, including yours.

Your next steps: When you communicate formally, informally or electronically, develop your Statement of Purpose, ROI, and Call to Action while knowing exactly who your audience is and what they want.

What… no socks?

What… no socks?

Details matter.

Picture you’re on a set for a commercial shoot. It’s a “video village” collection of director’s chairs and monitors. 36 professionals from makeup, hair and wardrobe to teleprompter & script editors to ad agency folks to the photography team to the director hover over their respective domains of production.

Such was the background for my week of coaching the talent on set for this large tech company.

The action starts. The talent begins to share his message. And… then… everything comes to a dead halt.

The ankle reveal.

The two producers, zooming in from Seoul, say, “We don’t like the talent’s ankles.”

They go on to comment, “The focus needs to be on his face and his content, and we are distracted by the half-inch of revealed ankles between his loafers and the European cut pants.”

What’s this have to do with you?

You’re probably not doing video shoots with 36-people production crews, BUT you are communicating as a leader all the time… AND DETAILS MATTER.

Little details that create big outcomes.

  • Your gestures – are you fiddling with your cuticles, wringing your hands, or pushing your hair repetitively behind your ears?
  • Your stance – are you swaying, standing more on one leg and then the other, pacing, doing a meaningless fox trot movement, or slouching?
  • Your eye contact – are you just looking at the power people in the room, staring out over the tops of audiences’ heads, or doing the eye dart maneuver?
  • Your setting/background in-person or virtually  – are you fighting for your audience’s flea-sized brain cells due to distractions behind you?

The rest of the commercial.

Our video production stops for 55 minutes! Big discussions are held between the wardrobe people, the ad agency people, the on-set director, and the producers in Seoul.

My talent puts on a pair of socks.

Production continues.

Guess what? It was the right move. Your gaze never goes down to the guy’s feet (even though you never realize that his ankles cause a distraction).

Don’t get me started on how much time it took to select the pillows on the background couch.

Details matter.

#communication  #KarenCortellReisman  #SpeakForYourself  #DetailsMatter

4 presentation clues you might be missing

4 presentation clues you might be missing

A compelling presentation is NEVER just about your data.

4 questions to ask yourself – and answer (!) –  before giving any speech

1️⃣ How much time do you have?

Your best friend when giving a presentation is your clock or timer.

  • Don’t: glance at your watch while speaking – that’s distracting for you and your listeners.
  • Do: prepare and practice your comments to fit within your time limit.

2️⃣ How much do they know or need to know about your topic?

Your stealth bomb on getting heard above the noise is all around meeting the needs of your audience.

  • Don’t: underestimate or overestimate the topic knowledge level of your crowd.
  • Do: your due diligence on finding out their interest, experiences, pain points and successes on whatever you are about to say.

3️⃣ So what? What’s in it for them?

My clients often miss this one: the ROI – the Return On Investment for your listeners.

  • Don’t: forget to share this ROI, near the beginning of your remarks, out loud. Don’t: make it hard on your crowd to understand what they’ll gain from you.
  • Do: tell us how you’ll solve some issue, help us be more efficient, save us time and headaches, improve our bottom line. Pick any of these that work for your message, or figure out how you will help us… and then tell us.

4️⃣ What do you want them to do, think, or feel as a result of your speech or digital message?

If you don’t move the conversation forward in some way, then whatever you’ve shared in your message is a waste of our time. One of my mentors, Jeanne Robertson, of blessed memory, was a humorist. Her Call To Action (CTA) was to make us laugh and help us find the humor around us, even when times are tough. Perfect.

  • Don’t: leave us hanging!
  • Do: understand your CTA and share that with us. What are our “next steps” after reading your email or listening to your message?

Next steps for you

Be compelling when you speak by sticking to your time limit, creating your message to meet the needs of your audience, sharing your ROI, and moving your conversation forward by adding your Call to Action.

#communication #speakforyourself #karencortellreisman

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