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PowerPoint Power Tips (hint – stop doing what you always do!)

PowerPoint Power Tips (hint – stop doing what you always do!)

Audiences rebel against PowerPoint

Have you ever gone to sleep at night saying to yourself, “Darn! I wish I had seen one more PowerPoint deck today.” ?

Have you ever gone to sleep saying to yourself, “Darn! I wish I had been more inspired today.”* ?

You, all of you, from CEO to Sales to Personnel to Purchasing, you are killing us with your PowerPoint.

That’s because bullets kill.

Five Main PowerPoint Offenders

  • Too many graphics on one slide.
  • Too many topics.
  • Too many bullets & too many sentences (which are worse than bullets).
  • Too many details.
  • Too many dissolves, spins or other cheesy transitions.

Every Main Offender on this list starts with “too many” because you are over-stuffing each slide. We do not know where to look first. In the midst of our confusion, we stop listening to you in hopes of being entertained by something on your slide.

Boredom + lethargy sets in and we shift over to what we really want to do – a sneaky wild round of Candy Crush Saga.

So, what’s a great slide look like?

It’s VISUAL.

Effective slides incorporate these three commandments

  1. Thou Must use good, clear (not copyrighted by someone else) pictures that support your message.
  2. Thou Must think ‘Less is More’ when putting your slides together. At the very least, can you please take one busy slide with many points and divide it into several slides so that each one has only one point/slide?
  3. Thou Must remember YOU are the presenter, NOT your slide deck. Don’t hide behind your PowerPoint deck – literally (you’re standing in the dark or hidden by your computer) and figuratively (you’re reading your slides and adding nothing else).

On the other hand, keep doing what you always do and Speak For Yourself® & Associates will remain busy cleaning it up for you!

*FYI, inspiration comes from stories that reinforce your message that can be supported by great visuals.

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Photo ©:  123RF Stock Photo

 

One Trick for Texting that Guarantees More Productivity

One Trick for Texting that Guarantees More Productivity

Text messaging (92%) is second only to phone calls at 95% as the most widely used form of communication.

Texting is integral to the way you now communicate due to its speed, convenience and ability to create a permanent record.

So, how can you get more efficient with texting?

The other day I texted a fellow boutique business owner. She’s busy. I’m busy. I had three different time-sensitive questions to ask. I numbered the questions… #1, #2 and #3.

Because she’s smart, she answered each question using the same numbering and same order.

I responded … and you know how … same numbering system.

Done! Questions answered! In less than 10 minutes.

Your Texting Trick for more productivity

Organize your texts by numbering your questions, or answers, or observations.

Heed this one tip because an organized  text can save you time and money.

Number away.

PS: What other time-saving texting tips do you use?

➜ Thank you to @AnnZimmermanGallant for being this blog’s muse. You also do great texts! 😎

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

How to Really Know a Person

How to Really Know a Person

David Brooks talks to me while I’m doing my gym workout.

David, a bestselling author, reads his latest book, How To Know a Person – The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen, into my ear buds while I’m lifting weights.

He’s making lots of sense on how to best navigate through our personal and professional pursuits.

In this short blog series I’ll share some of Brooks’ findings on qualities that make it hard to see others; and qualities that make it easy to see other people in all their fullness.

Today I’ll focus on the former – what Brooks defines as Diminishers.

Diminishers: How not to see a person

➜  Egotism – Being self-centered.

A Diminisher is all about, “Let me tell you my opinion.” Brooks comments that many people are unable to step outside of their own points of view which shows up as a lack of curiosity about other people.

➜  The Lesser-Minds Problem – Perceiving that you are more complicated, subtle and high-minded than others.

You have access to all of your thoughts/motivations and just a tiny access to other people’s minds shared by what they say out loud.

For example, Brooks writes, when business school students answered why they were going into business the common response was, “I care about doing something worthwhile.” When asked why others were going into business, they replied, “For the money.” Lesser motivations, lesser minds!

➜  Instant Size-up – Making generalizations about groups and cultural trends.  

“The size-up is what you do when you first meet someone: You check out their look, and you immediately start making judgments about them…. Most of us have inborn proclivities that prevent us from perceiving others accurately.”

All in all, Diminishers make it hard to really see others. Next week I’ll share some of Brooks’ set of skills for being an Illuminator, the ability to see others in their fullness. It does not just happen.

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

Super Bowl LVIII Best Commercial & what this ad models about super communication

Super Bowl LVIII Best Commercial & what this ad models about super communication

We are back with our annual selection of the best Super Bowl Commercial.

Speak For Yourself® picks our favorite commercial each year. Why? To learn best ways to get YOUR message across without paying over $LVIII,000,000. (the 30-second spot + talent + production).

Drum Roll….

This year Dunkin Donuts’ ‘The DunKings’ commercial wins.

Use this list of DunKing strategies for your next board presentation, zoom meeting or project review all modeled in this commercial.

1️⃣  Clarity. Many of the ads tried too hard and became disjointed. You could not figure out what they were selling till the last second. Our DunKing ad reveals the product up front. From the first to the last expensive nano-second you see the Dunkin’ logo and/or the company brand colors.

🏈 Note to you: Are you using your logo and brand colors everywhere, from your digital presence to your merchandise?

2️⃣  Self-deprecating humor. Our well-known cast, Ben Affleck, Matt Damon, Tom Brady, Jack Harlow, Jennifer Lopez, & Fat Joe make fun of themselves throughout this ad. Look at their outfits!

🏈 Note to you: Laugh at yourself – it makes you more approachable. We will then want to listen to you.

3️⃣  Call to Action.  Affleck tells Damon as they walk away, “Chill. They’re naming a new drink after us”. A new product is born at Dunkin’ Donuts! In other commercials you had to really search for the product and its relevance.

🏈 Note to you: End your emails, presentations and meetings asking for what you want. Include “next steps.” Move the conversation forward.

4️⃣  BONUS TIdbitAccording to CNN, “Part of the deal to get Affleck on board was Dunkin’ making a sizable donation to his nonprofit.”

🏈 Note to you: Have integrity. It will show up even if you don’t advertise it.

Your LVIII-million dollar communication takeaways ➜

Be clear about who you are, what you want, and what you are pitching. Be consistent with your branding. And find the humor.

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved 

A Powerful Communication Lesson from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

A Powerful Communication Lesson from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Note – This blog, originally published on 1.17.17, has been one of our most popular posts. The message remains true and I’d like to share it again on this Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday.

MLK uses the Anaphora Effect.

You’re asking, “What’s the Anaphora Effect?”

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr.’s American federal holiday marking his birthday, celebrated earlier this week, let’s highlight one of the genius components of his famous “I Have a Dream” speech delivered in 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

He uses the Anaphora Effect exquisitely.

Definition of Anaphora

It’s the repetition of words at the start of successive clauses, phrases or sentences.

Why use Anaphora phrases? To create a rhythm, heighten emotion, and add emphasis to make the message easier to remember.

In MLK’s famous speech:

  • Now is the time” is repeated three times in the sixth paragraph.
  • One hundred years later”, “We can never be satisfied”, “With this faith”, “Let freedom ring”, and “free at last” are also repeated.
  • Of course, the most widely cited example of anaphora is found in the often quoted phrase “I have a dream”, which is repeated eight times as King paints a picture of an integrated and unified America.

You might have learned in your English writing classes to not repeat words too often in written form. It depends. Using a catchy phrase can enhance your email or Chairman’s Report.

Your Speak For Yourself® challenge:

Use the Anaphora Effect digitally, informally and in formal presentations to create more buy-in.

 

 

Photos taken by Robin Sachs Photography. Thank you to Robin for joining me in Atlanta to tour the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and the Martin Luther King National Historical Park!

© 2024 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved

 

The #1 best phrase people who’re good at small talk use

The #1 best phrase people who’re good at small talk use

You’re headed into this holiday season. You’ll probably encounter extended family and friends. Your conversations will start with small talk, defined as “polite and standard conversation about unimportant things.”

While small talk might seem trivial, it can net big benefits – around the holiday table and in your various business settings.

This initial type of conversation can help drive richer connections by finding common interests while also demonstrating empathy. At the very least you’ll gain more insights about the other person.

How do you do this?

According to Matt Abrahams, author of “Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You’re Put on the Spot“, use this power phrase: “Tell me more.”

“Support responses” vs “Shift responses”

Abrahams defines these two types of responses. “Tell me more” is a support response. You are supporting what the other person says. You are inviting the other person to keep expressing themselves. You are winning the gold medal of active listening.

“Shift responses” create the opposite outcome. You shift away from the other person and hook back to your own agenda. In essence, you hijack the conversation.

Example: “We really had a rough travel day! Got stuck in Chicago for 3 hours and missed the connection at DFW.”

Support response: “Tell me more.”

Shift response: “You think that was bad, one time we were going to JFK but landed in Philadelphia because JFK flooded!”

You might have a great story about your JFK/Philly calamity but you’ve shut down the other person.

Other “support responses”

In addition to the best response, “tell me more”, other support responses include asking more questions about the details of the event or the emotions around the event. “What happened next?”  or  “Did that make you go crazy?”  or “How did you handle that?”

When to use “shift responses”

You don’t want to sound like you’re doing a legal deposition either! There does come a time to share your own anecdotes and experiences.  Give and take conversations create more meaningful encounters.

Happy Thanksgiving!

So, as you head into the holiday season remember that information talks and wisdom listens. Use more “support responses”.

I am grateful for your support of this blog!

source: CNBC: https://apple.news/Ayem5YVoMQE2jk2m-SMYvjQ

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