You may think that the top ways to make a great first impression revolve around what you say. Nope. You may think that your initial impression on others has to do with how you’re dressed. Nope. Finally, you may think your best way to create a positive impression is your eye contact and smile. Wrong again.

Your Top Tip on making a great first impression

Your posture.

All of the above strategies help create rapport with others. But, your posture speaks volumes. And it’s the first way you clock in with others as you enter into a room.

Why are we not getting this right?!

I include me in this question. All of us make mistakes regarding our posture! The culprit: our blessed cell phones.

“Text neck” is a term you might have heard. You’re hunching over to look at your phone compared with holding your head upright.

In a NYT article by Melinda Wenner Moyer titled “Text Neck, Pinkie Pain and Other Ways Phones Can Wreck Our Bodies” she claims “Health providers say they are seeing more patients than ever with pain and joint ailments in their hands, necks, shoulders and upper backs — and that mobile phones are most likely playing a part.”

In addition to neck pain, you’re missing your opportunity of taking advantage of the best way to make a great first impression.

Why posture wins The First Impression Game

Think about people in your world that you hold in high esteem. I’ve ask this question across North America at speaking engagements. Then I ask my audiences, “How does this person you admire walk into a room and interact with others? Are they slumped over or do they have great posture?” Answers from across time (100% of the time): “They have great posture!  They walk tall.”

Yes, your eye contact, your smile, your conversations are also excellent ways to make a great first impression. But the way you stand and hold your body, OR sit in a zoom room, begins the process of creating that positive impact.

Author: Karen Cortell Reisman is Founder of Speak For Yourself®, a communication consulting firm, and the author of 2 books on how to communicate. She lives in Dallas, Texas and will try to put down her phone and walk tall when entering any room.

Thank you to C. K. and your inquiry and our conversation today for this blog’s inspiration.

© 2022 Karen Cortell Reisman, All rights reserved

Pin It on Pinterest